About Us

About Us

The National Renal Complement Therapeutics Centre opened in 2016. We specialise in atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathy. Our collective expertise encompasses clinical, diagnostic and research staff based within Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Newcastle University.

We offer advice on the diagnosis and management of these rare conditions. Patients are generally managed by their local nephrologist but patients can be seen in our specialist clinic in Newcastle or have a consultation with clinical team by telephone or video-call if preferred.

Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

 

We’re proud to serve the people of the North East but we’re so much more than a group of top class local hospitals. Rated ‘Outstanding’ by the Care Quality Commission, the Newcastle Hospitals are recognised nationally and internationally as a centre of healthcare excellence, with almost a third of our patients coming from outside Tyne & Wear to benefit from our wide range of specialist services.

For more information visit: http://www.newcastle-hospitals.org.uk/

NRCTC and aHUS

Members of our team have been instrumental in research into pathogenic mechanisms of aHUS that has revealed the important role of complement. Approximately 50% of patients with aHUS have an underlying complement abnormality. Eculizumab is a complement inhibitor that was recommended by NICE in the treatment of aHUS in England. Eculizumab is currently funded by NHS England through the national aHUS service based within the National Renal Complement Therapeutics Service at the Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

NRCTC and C3G

The optimal treatment for C3G remains unclear. Many of the complement abnormalities in patients with C3G appear to affect the amplification pathway of complement. Eculizumab is a complement inhibitor of the terminal pathway that was recommended in the treatment of aHUS in England. The use of Eculizumab has been reported in C3G and its use in the National Health Service has been recently reviewed. Eculizumab was commissioned in February 2017 for use in a subset of patients with recurrent C3G following renal transplantation. Implementation of this policy is currently being setup and will be based within the National Renal Complement Therapeutics Service at the Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.